Anthropological Curiosities

Anthropological Curiosities News pertaining to all things Anthropology and Archaeology. New finds, old info, fascinating pictures and quotes.

Reblogged from missellarivera

missellarivera:

Before They Pass Away by Jimmy Nelson.

This is a long term project, displaying beautiful photographs of remote tribes, out in the valleys, jungles and ice fields etc. Nelsons goal is to capture their magnificent essence in pictures, before they pass away.

For more click here.

sci-universe:

Happy Charles Darwin Day!
“There is grandeur in this view of life, with its several powers, having been originally breathed into a few forms or into one; and that, whilst this planet has gone cycling on according to the fixed law of gravity, from so simple a beginning endless forms most beautiful and most wonderful have been, and are being, evolved.” 
Illustration by Alan Kennedy

Reblogged from theolduvaigorge

sci-universe:

Happy Charles Darwin Day!

“There is grandeur in this view of life, with its several powers, having been originally breathed into a few forms or into one; and that, whilst this planet has gone cycling on according to the fixed law of gravity, from so simple a beginning endless forms most beautiful and most wonderful have been, and are being, evolved.”

Illustration by Alan Kennedy

"The job of the anthropologist is to make explicit what’s taken for granted by everyone else."

Reblogged from zomganthro

Allan Young (via beahomebody)

Reblogged from alphacaeli

scientificillustration:

Bones by Chamo San

(Source: artsyrup)

"A 1.34-million-year-old partial skeleton of the Plio-Pleistocene hominin Paranthropus boisei – including arm, hand, leg and foot fragments – found at the Olduvai Gorge site in Tanzania represents one of the most recent occurrences of the hominin before its extinction in East Africa.” -Sci-News.com

"A 1.34-million-year-old partial skeleton of the Plio-Pleistocene hominin Paranthropus boisei – including arm, hand, leg and foot fragments – found at the Olduvai Gorge site in Tanzania represents one of the most recent occurrences of the hominin before its extinction in East Africa.” -Sci-News.com

Reblogged from alphacaeli

alphacaeli:

theolduvaigorge:

Skull Suggests Single Human Species Emerged From Africa, Not Several

Well-Preserved Find 1.8 Million Years Old Drastically Simplifies Evolutionary Picture

  • by Robert Lee Hotz

"A newly discovered 1.8 million-year-old skull offers evidence that humanity’s early ancestors emerged from Africa as a single adventurous species, not several species as believed, drastically simplifying human evolution, an international research team said Thursday.

The skull—the most complete of its kind ever discovered—is “a really extraordinary find,” said paleoanthropologist Marcia Ponce de Leon at the University of Zurich’s Anthropological Institute and Museum, who helped analyze it. “It is in a perfectly preserved state.”

Unearthed at Dmanisi in Georgia—an ancient route in the Caucasus for the first human migrations out of Africa—the skull was found at a spot where partial fossils of four other similar individuals and a scattering of crude stone tools had been found several years ago. They all date from a time when the area was a humid forest where saber-tooth tigers and giant cheetahs prowled. Preserved in siltstone beneath the hilltop ruins of a medieval fortress, the remains are the earliest known human fossils outside Africa, experts said.

David Lordkipanidze, director of the Georgian National Museum, who led the team, reported the discovery in Science. The primitive skull was first uncovered on Aug. 5, 2005—his birthday. “It was a very nice present,” he said.

Taken together, the finds at Dmanisi are especially important because experts in evolution could analyze the physical differences between individuals living in the same place at the same time almost 2 million years ago, when humankind first emerged from Africa to people the world, according to Yale University anthropologist Andrew Hill.

"It gives you a chance to look at variation for the first time," said Dr. Hill, who was not involved in the discovery" (read more).

***Hmm. I need to read the study ASAP.

(Source: Wall Street Journal)

Here’s the original study. It’s not open access, though. Reading now~

The fantastically bejeweled skeletons of Catholicism’s forgotten martyrs.

randomblogsnet:

Dendrochronology was posted at http://www.randompicturesblog.com/2013/05/dendrochronology/

Dendrochronology

Reblogged from gwebarchaeology

randomblogsnet:

Dendrochronology was posted at http://www.randompicturesblog.com/2013/05/dendrochronology/

Dendrochronology

Reblogged from theolduvaigorge

theolduvaigorge:

The first evidence of cut marks and usewear traces from the Plio-Pleistocene locality of El-Kherba (Ain Hanech), Algeria: implications for early hominin subsistence activities circa 1.8 Ma

The current archaeological data on early hominin subsistence activities in Africa are derived chiefly from Sub-Saharan Plio-Pleistocene sites. The recent studies at El-Kherba (Ain Hanech) in northeastern Algeria expand the geographic range of evidence of hominin subsistence patterns to include the earliest known archaeological sites documented in North Africa. Dated to 1.78 million years ago (Ma), excavations from El-Kherba yielded an Oldowan industry associated with a savanna-like fauna contained in floodplain deposits. The faunal assemblage is dominated by large and medium-sized animals (mainly adults), especially equids, which are represented by at least 11 individuals. The mammalian archaeofauna preserves numerous cut-marked and hammerstone-percussed bones. Made of primarily limestone and flint, the stone assemblage consists of core forms, débitage, and retouched pieces. Evidence of usewear traces is found on several of the flint artifacts, indicating meat processing by early hominins. Overall, our subsistence analysis indicates that early hominins were largely responsible for bone modification at the site, which is also corroborated by other relevant taphonomic evidence. Moreover, at 1.78 Ma, the cutmarked bones recovered from El-Kherba represent the earliest known evidence for ancestral hominin butchery activities and large animal foraging capabilities in northern Africa”. 

(Image and text source: Journal of Human Evolution, 2013 64(12):137-150)

A 6,000 year old Tenerian skeleton found in the Sahara with its middle finger in its mouth.

A 6,000 year old Tenerian skeleton found in the Sahara with its middle finger in its mouth.